In 1959, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi embarked on a global quest to revive the practice of a simple meditation technique known as Transcendental Meditation®, with the goal of helping people achieve lives free of stress and infused with inner peace. Since then, millions of people, in over 50 countries, have learned Transcendental Meditation. The importance... of turning inward and relieving stress is now widely accepted around the world due to Maharishi's efforts. As part of his revival of this ancient wisdom, Maharishi introduced Ayurveda to the western world. In Sanskrit, Ayurveda literally translated means "the science of life." In honor of him, our company is named Maharishi Ayurveda. Maharishi means "great seer" in Sanskrit, and it is appropriate that the revival of this ancient knowledge is prefaced this way. Maharishi was unyielding when it came to the authenticity of these ancient formulations and their purity. In the early days of Maharishi Ayurveda, Maharishi, surrounded by the greatest Ayurvedic experts in India, rejected formulas due to minor deviations from the ancient original texts or due to lack of purity in the formula. This is the foundation of vpk® by Maharishi Ayurveda: Authentic, Pure, Effective and Safe. For more information on our Founder and the Transcendental Meditation technique, please visit http://www.tm.org. - See more at: http://www.mapi.com/our-story/our-story.html#gsc.tab=0 More

De-stress During Seasonal Chaos

coupleinsnow De-stress During Seasonal Chaos

With looming to-do lists, invite lists, gift lists, wish lists, and grocery lists, the most wonderful time of the year can quickly become seasonal chaos. It’s no wonder that many of us feel so stressed out during the holiday season!

The expectations of holiday shopping, hosting or visiting family, having so much to do and so many decisions to make, may cause Prana Vata, the subdosha of Vata that governs mental functioning, to go out of balance. Aggravated Prana Vata can cause excessive worry, occasional feelings of anxiety and trouble sleeping — thus making it difficult to remain calm and stay happy during one of the best times of the year. If we become more and more stressed, we enjoy the holidays less and less.

The holiday season does not have to be stressful. Ayurveda empowers us to balance our lives, in body, heart (emotional) and mind. We can utilize healing ayurvedic herbs to stay calm, balanced and de-stressed during the holidays. The experience of holiday chaos is inversely proportional to our state of balance; the more balanced we are, the less we feel that life is chaos. Nothing may change on the outside, but how we experience our world can change — for the better.

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Give Thanks for Your Digestion!

business-people-at-lunch-picture-id515884946 Give Thanks for Your Digestion!

The holiday season brings feasts, parties, merry-making and heavy foods. Big meals complete with turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy leave us sleepy and ready for an afternoon nap on the sofa in front of the fireplace. If you're concerned about increasing your immunity during the flu season, you'll want to avoid overeating.

Instead, take time to savor each bite and stop eating when you are satisfied. Before each meal, pause for a moment and be thankful for your digestive system, the food, the cooks and the Creator. Digestion is the process of taking in and assimilating Intelligence from the universe to feed and nourish our own Inner Intelligence.

Through our digestive tract and our senses, we digest and metabolize our food and our experiences. If we digest well, we maintain good health. If we don't digest so well, ama is formed (ama is the ayurvedic term for impurities, the sticky stuff that clogs the srotas, or the channels of flow). Ama is defined by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi as, "the product of unripe digestion of food and experiences." Ama is fertile ground for viruses and bacteria to multiply and cause disease.

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Ayurvedic Strategies for Healthy Holiday Eating

friendship-and-communication-concept-top-view-of-group-of-eight-happy-picture-id936575774 Ayurvedic Strategies for Healthy Holiday Eating

‘Tis the season to be snacking! From Thanksgiving through Valentine’s Day, the holidays present an extended string of festive gatherings that center around food and drinks. While living it up with friends, family, and colleagues can be fun, it can also be a bit stressful — especially with travel, gift buying, hectic schedules, and easy access to rich and sugary foods.

“When there’s stress involved, our choices can become more reactive, rather than coming from a grounded place and connected to the self,” says Sankari Wegman, an Ayurvedic consultant at The Raj who also teaches Ayurvedic cooking classes. Moreover, Wegman tells us, it’s particularly easy to feel stressed during Vata season, which falls in autumn. “Vata by nature is light and airy, and it gets thrown out of balance when there’s any kind of irregularity.”

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The Ayurvedic Take on Paleo, Keto, Vegan, and Raw Diets

groats-mung-beans-picture-id940672844 The Ayurvedic Take on Paleo, Keto, Vegan, and Raw Diets

The caveman diet. Going keto. Eating raw foods and juicing. Does it seem like there’s a trendy new diet cropping up every time you turn around? If so, you might be wondering how to keep up—which one to choose and whether you can still follow your Ayurvedic diet.

"There’s going to be a new diet literally every month, if not sooner," says Robert Keith Wallace, author of  Gut Crisis. "The value of Ayurveda is that it gives you kind of a filter. It’s a long tradition. It’s not just a fad, and it gives you an idea of how your individual, mind-body type will respond to one of these new diets."

Below, we’ll give you a rundown of the Paleo, keto, vegan, and raw diet regimens, along with some Ayurvedic insights on how each diet relates to the dosha types.

TAKE THE DOSHA  QUIZ HERE

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Aid your digestion with these three Ayruvedic Chutney recipes

indian-cuisine-apple-chutney-with-lemon-and-spices-closeup-on-the-picture-id1041597278
In Ayurveda, fruits are considered one of the purest foods that enhance ojas ( vitality, immunity and strength). They are chocked full of nutrients and vitamins and antioxidant properties. There are different types of chutneys  incorporating the six tastes and using many different types of fruits and spices. When used correctly, chutneys can aid in digestion, kindle agni and promote health. 

Typically, chutneys are rather easy to prepare. In general, the fruits and spices are blended together and served. In some cases, the spices are roasted first and then added to the blender. 

The three chutney recipes below are from Heaven’s Banquet by Miriam Kasin Hospodar.
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Focus on Fall Health

smiling-woman-looking-up-against-trees-picture-id629868062 Focus on Fall Health

As the dog days of summer wind down and a hint of crisp fall weather cools the night air, you might find yourself suddenly looking forward to going back to school or picking up the pace at work after a lazier summer.

The seasons affect us. A saying in Maharishi Ayurveda, "As is the macrocosm, so is the microcosm," captures an important principle: the outer environment affects our inner state of mind and body. When the weather is hot and humid during Pitta season (July-October), those Pitta qualities of heat build in the body as well. When the air is cool and dry in Vata season (November-February), we experience more of those qualities inside us.

Ritucharya: Staying in Balance as the Seasons Change

When the temperature, humidity, and length of days start changing as a new season begins, we respond to these changes in nature by desiring different foods and daily routine. In the hot months, for instance, most people choose cooler, lighter foods and take it easy more often, even indulging in afternoon naps when they have the chance. As the weather cools in fall, we suddenly start feeling more energetic and desire warming foods and tastes.

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Apple Pancakes

applepancake Apple Pancakes
Why We Love This RecipeThe addition of apples can add a sweet and tart flavor (depending on the apples), and ground almonds makes this pancake batter nutritious and nourishing. Cooked fruit is also wonderfully pacifying for Vata dosha. Cinnamon and cardamom help with digestion, and ghee adds a touch of sattva (the quality of lightness and purity).These pancakes are made with a crepe batter which is softer and more moist than regular pancake batter. They are also sweeter because of the apples, so they don't require any topping and can be eaten by themselves.Apple PancakesMakes 16 three-inch pancakesIngredients1½ cups unbleached white flour½ teaspoon salt2 tablespoons arrowroot1⅓ tablespoons organic sugar2 teaspoons ground almondsPinch of cardamom⅛ teaspoon ground cinnamon2 tablespoons melted ghee1½ cups plain soy milk3 sweet applesDirectionsIn a mixing bowl, mix the dry ingredients. Add ghee and soy milk and mix into a smooth, thick batter with a mixer or a whisk.Peel and core apples and grate on a medium-size grater. Stir grated apples into the batter.Place a skillet on medium heat. Lightly coat with ghee. Pour ⅓ cup of batter onto the skillet. Pour 3 or 4 pancakes at a time, depending on the size of your skillet.When the sides of the pancakes start to turn hard, flip them over with a spatula. Cook both sides to a golden brown.Organic Vata Churna Calming Spice Mix  Add flavor and balanceOrganic Pitta Churna Cooling Spice MixCool your mind and bodyOrganic Kapha Churna Stimulating Spice MixWake up your taste buds
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Cashew Coconut Hummus

coconuthumus Cashew Coconut Hummus
Give your hummus a summer makeover! This deliciously creamy recipe from Heaven’s Banquet by Miriam Kasin Hospodar calls for Pitta-pacifying coconut milk, toasted cashews, and zippy ingredients like parsley, dill, and ginger.

A version that marches to the beat of a different drummer from the usual garlic-laden, tahini-based Middle Eastern hummus bi tehina.


Why We Love This Recipe 
Pitta dosha types, this hummus is for you! It offers a cooling take on traditional hummus. A bit of fresh ginger helps aid digestion in this protein-rich dish.

Note that you must soak the garbanzos overnight.
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Thrive in Late Summer with These Ayurvedic Tips

dandelion-silhouette-against-sunset-picture-id537716906 Thrive in Late Summer with These Ayurvedic Tips

Early fall is a transitional stage, as we move from the height of summer’s heat to cooler weather. In Ayurveda, the change from summer to fall is known as Ritu Sandhi, the gap between seasons. This gap can present a delicate time for digestion, because the weather fluctuates—along with the doshas and digestive capacity.

By the end of summer, Pitta dosha (heat) may have accumulated in your body, causing impurities that could lead to imbalances during cooler months if they’re not cleared out. And, if you’ve eaten a lot of cool foods over the summer, Vata dosha (coolness, dryness) may have built up as well.

For these reasons, this transitional period is an ideal time to gently cleanse and nurture your body. Here are seven easy, Ayurvedic ways to stay balanced during late summer.

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How to Look More Beautiful as You Age

female-beauty-applying-lotion-at-home-picture-id155879052 How to Look More Beautiful as You Age

No matter what your age, you can keep your skin looking like a teenager's by paying attention to the four pillars of youthful skin:

  • Nourish your skin all year round, both from the inside and from the outside.
  • Rehydrate your skin internally and externally — maintaining moisture balance is crucial for skin health and appearance.
  • Detoxify from both the inside and outside to prevent the build-up of toxins and help keep skin clear and radiant.
  • Practice stress management — stress is the number one enemy of youthful skin.


Paying attention to these four pillars increases prabha, the natural luster and glow of the skin, and it is important to address all four aspects from the inside and the outside.

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Summer Pasta with Cream Sauce

creamy-zucchini-pasta-with-parmesan-and-basil-top-of-a-grey-table-picture-id855292240 Summer Pasta with Cream Sauce

This is a recipe to help keep the summer heat from getting to you. It's fast and delicious. And it's lighter than you might think. Remember to use organic ingredients whenever possible.

Also remember that Pitta season runs from July to October. As soon as the first heat waves of summer roll around, most of us feel the effects of the increased Pitta in the atmosphere — perhaps a shorter fuse than usual, maybe more irritability and frustration, occasionally outbursts of anger. Whether you are predominantly Pitta by constitution or not, take measures to keep the fire element in balance during the heat of the summer.

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Ginger Cannellini Bruschetta

bruchetta Ginger Cannellini Bruschetta

Summertime means lots of gatherings with family and friends sharing good food and drinks. Whether it's a pool party, block party or just because party, a weekend free is always an opportunity to play hostess.  Chips and charred salsa is always a good fall-back plan but having a a few new ideas in your back pocket can create a new experience. 

This is a great quick recipe for an appetizer to a larger meal. It is substantial and piquant. Serve at a group gathering along with crudités and your other favorite hors d'oeuvres.

Makes approximately 16

Ingredients

  • 4 Tbsp. garlic ghee
  • 2 tomatoes
  • Approx. 2 cups (16 oz.) small white beans (cannellini), soaked and cooked until tender
  • ⅛ cup olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • 3 Tbsp. ginger preserve
  • 1 tsp. dried dill weed
  • 1 tsp. coarse salt
  • ½ tsp. fresh ground pepper
  • 1 very fresh baguette, cut lengthwise and in 3-inch slices (approximately 16 slices)
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5 Benefits of Turmeric, Ayurveda’s Golden Botanical

fresh-and-dried-turmeric-roots-in-a-wooden-bowl-picture-id690557976 5 Benefits of Turmeric, Ayurveda’s Golden Botanical

Turmeric (a.k.a. Indian Saffron) is a relative newcomer to American spice racks, but it’s been a mainstay in Indian cooking—and medicine—for thousands of years. The twisty root that gives your bowl of curry its bright, yellow color and distinctive flavor also holds a place of honor in traditional Ayurvedic medicine.

 

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Zucchini Bread (Ayurveda Recipe)

Zucchini Bread Zucchini Bread

"Vegetables are a must on a diet. I suggest carrot cake, zucchini bread, and pumpkin pie."  - Jim Davis

Summer squash typically called "zucchini" were developed in northern Italy in the second half of the 19th century. Zucchini is one of the easiest vegetables to grow in a backyard garden and can produce a copious amount. Zucchini has a delicate flavor and requires little more than quick cooking with butter or olive oil, with or without fresh herbs.

zucchini BreadThis recipe uses grated zucchini to make a moist and delicious sweet bread. Enjoy!

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Ayurvedic Walnut Veggie BrainBurgers

brainburger Ayurvedic Walnut Veggie BrainBurgers -Chef Domnick Mason

The English walnut has a rich, expansive history and the respect of modern science. Here's a veggie burger featuring the walnut from Chef Domnick Mason at the Raj Ayurvedic resort and spa in Fairfield Iowa. The Raj, for the last 25 years has provided a full range of authentic panchakarma treatments to clientele worldwide as well as meals for guests and the community that feature organic foods - much of it local.

This is the recipe for the famous Raj veggie-burger featuring the brain-nourishing, health-supporting walnut. Nuts are considered an important part of the vegetarian diet as they supply fiber, minerals, and vitamins. They contain beneficial phytochemicals. Some contain many different forms of plant sterols, which are believed to help moderate blood cholesterol. Some of the volatile oils in nuts contain antioxidants that help counter free radical damage. Tree nuts like almonds, walnuts and pecans contain no cholesterol. Most of the calories in nuts come from fat, but mainly unsaturated fat, and fat performs some essential functions in the body. A growing body of scientific research spotlights the health benefits of this delicious nut.

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Seasonal Veggie Quinoa Salad with Pitta Churna Dressing

seasonal-veggie-quinoa-salad Seasonal Veggie Quinoa Salad with Pitta Churna Dressing
Fresh foods contain "prana," or life-giving energy, and are as close to nature as possible.

Prana is the vital energy present in fresh vegetables and fruits and pure air that we breathe. One of the reasons for eating is to imbibe prana, so you want to choose foods that are high in prana. The more you eat of life-giving foods, the more health and longevity you are likely to enjoy. Ayurveda considers food very powerful medicine. Make the best use of the foods you prepare and eat by choosing fresh, organic, filled-with-prana foods! 

Incorporating more fresh vegetables and fruits in your diet will give you an immediate energy boost. It's also important to cut the vegetables and cook them fresh at every meal. Buying pre-cut vegetables means that you have already lost some of the prana. For that reason, buy vegetables and fruits whole for maximum vitality.

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Ayurvedic Fried Plantains (Bananas)

plaintains Ayurvedic Fried Plantains (Bananas)

Plantains are a delicious fruit belonging to the genus Musa, which includes the banana. There is no formal botanical distinction between plantains and bananas. Plantains are often eaten cooked. The plantain (banana) is indigenous to tropical Southeast Asia — including Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and the Philippines — and Northern Australia.

In ayurvedic terms, plantains have an astringent taste. People who need to balance Pitta and Kapha generally need to eat more bitter and astringent foods. Raw plantains and bananas can be harder to digest and, when eaten uncooked, are cold in nature, so cooking is an ideal way to prepare this fruit. In ayurveda, the banana is thought of as nature’s personal fountain of youth. It is known for stimulating healthy digestion and helps the body retain essential elements such as calcium, potassium, and phosphorus. Enjoy!

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Stress and Immunity: The Microbiome Connection

Smilingscouple Stress and Immunity: The Microbiome Connection

Life has its ups and downs, and stress is a natural part of human existence. These days, though, American stress levels are at a record high, according to the American Psychological Association. We discussed the stress-microbiome connection with Robert Keith Wallace, Ph.D., who—along with his wife and co-author Samantha Wallace—wrote Gut Crisis: How Diet, Probiotics, and Friendly Bacteria Help You Lose Weight and Heal Your Body and Mind.

Dr. Wallace is a pioneering researcher on the physiology of consciousness and the mind/body connection as applied to behavioral medicine. His seminal research on higher states of consciousness has been published in Science, The American Journal of Physiology, and Scientific American. He’s currently Chair of the Department of Physiology and Health at Maharishi University of Management, of which he was a founding President.

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Healing Greens 101: An Ayurvedic Perspective

Healing Greens 101: An Ayurvedic Perspective

No longer just a frilly garnish, kale is taking the culinary world by storm. Along with it, leafy greens like spinach, chard, and even collards and turnip greens are gracing plates everywhere from fine dining hotspots to fast food restaurants across the country.

These nutrient-packed veggies have long played a starring role in Ayurvedic cooking, and with good reason. They’re hydrating, nutrient-rich, and when prepared while fresh, they contain prana, or life-supporting energy. Below, we’ll share both Ayurvedic and nutritional insights on leafy greens, along with tasty ways to incorporate them into your daily diet.

Greens Are Good for You

From a nutritional perspective, leafy greens are excellent sources of antioxidant vitamins A and C, and they also provide vitamin E, folic acid, vitamin K, iron, calcium, magnesium, and fiber. They’re low in calories, and many varieties—especially the cruciferous (cabbage) family—contain unique enzymes that have been associated with supporting the immune system.

Ayurvedic vaidyas (experts) regularly prescribe a daily dose of leafy greens, because they’re good for your skin, hair, and for removing amavisha (toxic wastes) from the body. The human body is about 60 percent water, and leafy greens help purify your shrotas (the subtle channels of the body) and replenish your inner hydration stores.

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Apple Crisp (Video)

apple crisp

Apple Crisp is simple to prepare, easy to digest, and when served warm in the cold winter season is Vata-pacifying. Stewed fruit is always a favorite of ayurveda! 

Vata governs all movement in the mind and body. It controls blood flow, elimination of wastes, breathing and the movement of thoughts across the mind.

Since Pitta and Kapha cannot move without it, Vata is considered the leader of the three Ayurvedic Principles in the body. It's very important to keep Vata in good balance.

Recipe and video from from Heaven's Banquet, Vegetarian Cooking for Lifelong Health the Ayurveda Way

by Miriam Kasin Hospodar

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30 Simple Ways to Create Balance and Connection

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