It's easy to forget that we are all perfect in our own design. Sometimes we muck it up with habits and choices that do not serve us. 

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The Blissful Life And You

beautiful-woman-meditating-position-at-park-picture-id1205339396 Follow Your Bliss

When the great American mythologist Joseph Campbell first used the phrase, “Follow your bliss,” he inspired many people. He held out a vision that was radically different from the notion that hard work, persistence, and keeping your shoulder to the wheel was the key to success. But actually, achieving this new vision didn’t prove to be easy.

Campbell’s underlying intention had mythical and spiritual roots. This is clear when you read a bit more about his advice. “If you do follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you.” This is where people get confused and frustrated, however. They have something they love to do, but the invisible track doesn’t show up. Or what they love to do might have absolutely no financial aspect. What then?

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432 Hits

Discovering Your True Life Purpose

highway-at-sunrise-going-into-death-valley-national-park-picture-id1087673356 Discovering Your True Life Purpose

Discover what you need to notice that can lead you to your life purpose.

“If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living.” ~Joseph Campbell, 1904-1987, Writer and Lecturer


What does it really mean to “follow your bliss?”

One of the main tenets of Inner Bonding is that all our feelings are informational—letting us know when we are loving ourselves and when we are abandoning ourselves, and letting us know when something external to us is loving or safe, or unloving or dangerous. Our true bliss can be highly informational for us.

Bliss can be defined as complete happiness, delight, spiritual joy, ecstasy—a bit of heaven. The opposite of bliss is misery.

Sometimes this can get confusing, as when people say they are “blissed out” from a drug or from sex. Getting blissed out on drugs or sex is not going to lead you toward a healthy life of passion, meaning and purpose for you. In fact, this kind of bliss will likely prevent you from finding your true life purpose.

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437 Hits

The Hidden Power of “Follow Your Bliss”

lavender-field-at-sunset-picture-id468877651 The Hidden Power of “Follow Your Bliss”

When you take the popular phrase “Follow your bliss” and trace it back to its source, something more powerful was intended. In a late interview the famous expert on mythology Joseph Campbell first used the phrase, saying “If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you.”

This implication that bliss is a personal path, and that the path is pre-determined, is much more than “do what you really like to do,” which is how most people interpret “Follow your bliss.” Let me expand on this point by showing that “bliss” is much more fundamental than almost anyone realizes. It holds the key to transforming the mind.

 “If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you.”


Doing what you really like to do is certainly a good idea; it is much better than the opposite, doing what you have to do even if you don’t particularly like it. But no one can engage in pleasurable activity all the time. The human mind brings us experiences of pleasure and pain, and since the two are paired as inescapable opposites, mental tension and conflict are inevitable no matter how positive and pleasant you try to make your life be. (For deeper background, please see my most recent post, “Can You Make Your Mind Your Friend?”)

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741 Hits

Where Does Wellbeing Come From? A Better Answer

w\Where Does Wellbeing Come From? A Better Answer

It is much easier to understand what makes people unhappy than to understand what makes them happy. Happiness is undermined or destroyed by violence, poverty, illness, and other external factors, leading to the inner states of depression, anxiety, and misery. Here, the link between inner and outer poses no mystery. It seems common-sensical that by reversing the causes of unhappiness, happiness will result.

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926 Hits