GLOBAL ONENESS DAY

9th Annual Global Oneness Day Online Summit - Living Your Life for the Benefit of All. Wednesday, October 24th ( All Day Event - recordings available)

Nonviolent Communication

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Matcha Butter Balls + Changes

Hey friends! It’s been a little while. We took a break from posting, while we were in Italy hosting our first Abruzzo retreat. It was a dream come true, and we’ll be sharing more about that very soon.

Before we get into our favorite snack lately, we wanted to talk a little bit about growth and evolution as it relates to this space. We’ve been posting recipes here for close to nine years. It’s a practice that has almost unfailingly kept us inspired and excited about the daily ritual of cooking and nourishing ourselves and others. This whole blog is sort of a family album at this point, since we can pinpoint certain posts to the life events that were happening around us while cooking the dishes. It’s also surreal to be able to put something out there and know that a certain number of people will check out the recipe or even cook it in their own kitchens. It’s a special form of connection that we have with the world, and every time we hear from someone who has made and enjoyed one of the recipes is amazing. It never feels normal or old, truly.

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We’re back in the kitchen! American eating habits are changing.

Referencing the old saying, Everything old is new again—all of a sudden, cooking at home is trendy! A recent article in Bloomberg Business with data about current eating habits says,

“Home cooking would be making a comeback if it ever really went away. Restaurants are getting dinged by the convenience of Netflix, the advent of pre-made meals, the spread of online grocery delivery, plus crushing student debt and a focus on healthy eating. Eighty-two percent of American meals are prepared at home [emphasis mine]-- more than were cooked 10 years ago, according to researcher NPD Group Inc. The latest peak in restaurant-going was in 2000, when the average American dined out 216 times a year.” Read the full story.

Way back in the day, you just didn’t have a choice! You grew and cooked your food or you starved, with none of the distractions or choices that people have today. Being in the kitchen, cooking and feeding a family was a necessity. Things started shifting after World War II when convenience features and choices like frozen TV dinners manifested. Now we’re eating IN by choice, because it’s more economical and because we’re more concerned about our health and well-being.


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Avocado Soft Serve

I often buy those nets of not-yet-ripe, organic avocados to have them ripen later in the week. What ends up happening more often than not is that they all get ripe at the same time, and I can’t use them up fast enough. My solution is to mash up the avocados with some lime juice, then freeze the mash in ice cube trays to use in smoothies, quick avocado pudding and this soft serve, which we are completely obsessed with.

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What is nourishment?

In the past decade we’ve placed SO much emphasis on whole foods, clean foods, paleo vs. vegan, gluten-free, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant... I think we’re there already, don’t you? We know what healthy eating is. ENOUGH ALREADY! I want to move beyond the research, the data, the shoulds, the restrictions (and the ensuing guilt), and plant my flag right here: are you really being nourished by what you eat?

What is nourishment?

I’ll always remember the first retreat I cooked for at the Commonweal Cancer Help Program in Bolinas, California in 2000. With transient taste changes and discomfort resulting from treatment, people with cancer may eat so little they become malnourished. My challenge was to provide appealing, healing, tasty food. (In fact, this became a centerpiece of my culinary work.) It wasn’t just about nutrition; it was about comfort and nourishing these beautiful people on a very deep level. I rose to the occasion, and watching their faces as they took tentative bites and responded with closed eyes and blissful expressions was unforgettable! That’s nourishment. Deep comfort and delight. I’ve been signing my books “nourishing thoughts” ever since.

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Aid your digestion with these three Ayruvedic Chutney recipes

In Ayurveda, fruits are considered one of the purest foods that enhance ojas ( vitality, immunity and strength). They are chocked full of nutrients and vitamins and antioxidant properties. There are different types of chutneys  incorporating the six tastes and using many different types of fruits and spices. When used correctly, chutneys can aid in digestion, kindle agni and promote health. 

Typically, chutneys are rather easy to prepare. In general, the fruits and spices are blended together and served. In some cases, the spices are roasted first and then added to the blender. 

The three chutney recipes below are from Heaven’s Banquet by Miriam Kasin Hospodar.
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Top 8 Foods to Eat Every Week

This blog is the first of a three-part series on meal planning. For anyone looking to create more organization and improved quality of their weekly meals, it's important to have a solid place to start from. Have a colorful plant-based list of foods that all of the meals each week will be based around. The list below will give you enough color, variety, and flexibility to choose from seasonally. These staple ingredients are part of a Mediterranean diet, the most well researched diet, showing benefits for many of the chronic diseases the Western world faces today, including heart disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and mental illness.  Keep reading to see examples of how to apply the science into a weekly meal plan.

 

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Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice

Our farmers market is painted with all the stunning violet and purple shades of eggplant right now. I have the hardest time choosing which eggplants to get, since they are all so different and beautiful: plump, dark ones, speckled ‘graffiti’ ones, skinny Japanese eggplants… I want to buy them all. Eggplant is definitely up there among my favorite vegetables of all time. I also know that it’s quite a polarizing one, since a lot of people don’t enjoy the flavor or find eggplant intimidating to prepare.


Whenever someone tells me they don’t like eggplant, I try to point them in the direction of my marinated eggplant recipe – it’s in our 
latest cookbook, and it impresses seemingly everyone. Eggplant is spongy and absorbent, so marinating it transforms it into this super flavorful, velvety version of itself that seriously tastes like heaven. I also really like adding eggplant to curry or ciabotta and broiling it in the oven with a miso glaze. It has so much potential to be really delicious!




This eggplant fried rice is our latest obsession. It’s weeknight-friendly, satisfying, and full of fresh, late summer flavors.
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A Gravenstein applesauce story

Do you have annual food rituals that you love? Making tomato sauce when the season's at its peak, freezing ripe blueberries or making stock when soup season begins in fall? The fizz of anticipation, the planning ahead, the sheer contentment when the treasure is stored away for future delight. If you haven't tried it or tried it with a friend yet, do! Working side-by-side with a dear friend in the kitchen is one of the most nourishing experiences in the world. Enjoy!

Every year around the 2nd week of August, Gravenstein apples make their entrance at our farmer’s market in Marin County, California. Gravenstein is an apple cultivar that originated in the 17th century or earlier. The fruit has a superbly tart flavor cherished for cooking, and it has such a short harvest! Blink and you miss it — which makes it all the more precious. My culinary co-conspirator Julie Burford is our spy. When she sees the apples come in, she orders 40 pounds from the farmer. We are preparing to preserve! 

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Apple Pancakes

Why We Love This RecipeThe addition of apples can add a sweet and tart flavor (depending on the apples), and ground almonds makes this pancake batter nutritious and nourishing. Cooked fruit is also wonderfully pacifying for Vata dosha. Cinnamon and cardamom help with digestion, and ghee adds a touch of sattva (the quality of lightness and purity).These pancakes are made with a crepe batter which is softer and more moist than regular pancake batter. They are also sweeter because of the apples, so they don't require any topping and can be eaten by themselves.Apple PancakesMakes 16 three-inch pancakesIngredients1½ cups unbleached white flour½ teaspoon salt2 tablespoons arrowroot1⅓ tablespoons organic sugar2 teaspoons ground almondsPinch of cardamom⅛ teaspoon ground cinnamon2 tablespoons melted ghee1½ cups plain soy milk3 sweet applesDirectionsIn a mixing bowl, mix the dry ingredients. Add ghee and soy milk and mix into a smooth, thick batter with a mixer or a whisk.Peel and core apples and grate on a medium-size grater. Stir grated apples into the batter.Place a skillet on medium heat. Lightly coat with ghee. Pour ⅓ cup of batter onto the skillet. Pour 3 or 4 pancakes at a time, depending on the size of your skillet.When the sides of the pancakes start to turn hard, flip them over with a spatula. Cook both sides to a golden brown.Organic Vata Churna Calming Spice Mix  Add flavor and balanceOrganic Pitta Churna Cooling Spice MixCool your mind and bodyOrganic Kapha Churna Stimulating Spice MixWake up your taste buds

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)

I have a subscription to Bon Appétit, and I haven’t been able to get this Persian frittata recipe out of my head ever since I saw it in one of their issues this past year (there’s also a video of Andy Baraghani expertly making it here). The frittata is called kuku sabzi and is often served during Persian New Year that is celebrated on spring equinox, welcoming spring with the abundance of herbs in the dish. I’m obsessed with any food that requires a ton of herbs, and this frittata is loaded with parsley, dill, and cilantro. I also like making vegan ‘frittatas’ with chickpea flour, since I’m completely in love with socca, and chickpea frittatas are like socca x 100.

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Irresistibly summer: Tomatoes!

Come and get 'em! The last of this seasons heirloom tomatoes, in the full array of glowing oranges, reds, and golds. But—what to do with them? If you haven't yet tried slow-roasting tomatoes, you MUST! This caramelizes and intensifies the flavor. Be prepared to have your socks knocked off. :)

On my countertop right now I have a collection of tomatoes. It looks like they’re having babies! We’re at the pinnacle of tomato season, when they’re the juiciest, the most flavorful, the most irresistible. I can’t THINK of anything I don’t want to incorporate them into!

Besides slicing the most perfect tomato, drizzling on a little olive oil, sprinkling on some sea salt and just eating it, my other favorite thing to do with tomatoes is to roast them. When you roast tomatoes, they give up their amazing sugars and become so sweet! I’m very fond of roasting the yellow heirlooms, which are lower in acid, meaning they’re sweeter and easier to digest. I peel the bubbly skin right off and throw them into the blender with a handful of basil. People say, “Are you kidding me? That’s ALL you did?” It’s like drinking summer. Or add roasted tomatoes to any soup to turn it into something special. It’s like magic!

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The Infamous “If-Then Statement”

Do you ever turn your life into an “if-then statement?” If I have this, then I can do that. Unfortunately, life doesn’t always work that way. What if you can’t make the “if” part of the statement true? The second thing can’t follow, and instead you sit around waiting. Sometimes it’s worth just jumping ahead to the “then” part.

Alternatively, do you ever put off doing things because you don’t want to do them alone? A number of years ago, for instance, I wanted to go apple picking but thought that it would be more fun to do with someone else. When I couldn’t find a friend to join me, I decided to go by myself, leaping over the “if” and going right to the “then.” I took my dog, Molly, and found an organic U-Pick apple farm nearby.

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Cashew Coconut Hummus

Give your hummus a summer makeover! This deliciously creamy recipe from Heaven’s Banquet by Miriam Kasin Hospodar calls for Pitta-pacifying coconut milk, toasted cashews, and zippy ingredients like parsley, dill, and ginger.

A version that marches to the beat of a different drummer from the usual garlic-laden, tahini-based Middle Eastern hummus bi tehina.


Why We Love This Recipe 
Pitta dosha types, this hummus is for you! It offers a cooling take on traditional hummus. A bit of fresh ginger helps aid digestion in this protein-rich dish.

Note that you must soak the garbanzos overnight.
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Grain-Free Tomato Tart with Cauliflower Ricotta

You guys, this tart! It’s one of our very favorite recipes that we’ve developed lately. Beaming with excitement to share it with you.Our days have been full to the brim preparing for our retreat in Italy, planning a commissioned magazine shoot, and working on a new project that we are hoping to launch in November. It’s amazing to have our hands full with work that we’re in love with, but I would also be lying if I said that it’s all smooth sailing. Stress and overwhelm always find their way to creep in, and it’s been so important to employ our favorite self-love tools and practices to counteract stress and anxiety (much more on this in our upcoming new project!). Slowing down to cook a nourishing tart is definitely one of them.We are genuinely grateful for summer produce right now, since it needs so little to taste delicious. A lot of it doesn’t even need to be cooked: just chop, season, and serve, which has all been so helpful during this busy time. This tart is not exactly in the chop, season, and serve category, as it requires a little more work and thought. It does, however, depend on the sweetness of late summer tomatoes and cauliflower, and it’s so worth the extra little bit of work than you might be used to during this abundant season.

The tart consists of three elements that seem to have been made for one another: a 4-ingredient, grain-free crust, a savory cauliflower ricotta, and a layer of juicy, caramelized tomatoes on top.

I love making ‘ricotta’ with almonds or cashews, but thought that my usual recipe would be too heavy for this tart, since I needed a fairly good amount of it to fill up the whole crust. Cutting the nut ricotta with some steamed cauliflower worked amazingly well. If anything, the cauliflower contributed to the nutty and savory flavor of the cheese even further, while making the texture fluffy and light. It never hurts to add a dose of cruciferous veg to your meal, either ;) The richness of the ricotta is the best compliment to the sun-fed, juicy caramelized tomatoes that crown the tart. Add a (vegan) buttery crust to that, and you’re really in business.Because this tart is plant-based and doesn’t contain eggs to thicken the ricotta, and because I didn’t want to over-complicate the recipe with any vegan thickeners, the ‘cheese’ is quite soft straight out of the oven. It’s still possible to get a nice slice though, if you work with a sharp knife and a dependable pie server. The ricotta layer does thicken up after a night in the fridge, so your leftovers will be even more sliceable. We hope you’ll give it a try!

Click for GRAIN-FREE TOMATO TART WITH CAULIFLOWER RICOTTA Recipe Serves: one 10" tart

Cool as a Cucumber

Summer heat getting to you just a little bit? Have I got the coolest, most refreshing ideas for you! Soundtrack included.? An excellent solution from the archives. Enjoy!

My friends, cucumbers have changed! When I was growing up, cucumbers were fat and stubby with waxy skins and big, blah seeds. They were relegated to three uses: a garnish on the plate, sliced in a salad, or finely sliced in little tea sandwiches with butter on white bread. Honestly not a major player, nothing spectacular. The texture was unexciting, the seeds were annoying, the skin was bitter. Meh.

Oh, there was one other cucumber use! Me and my friends all put them on our eyes :) We had sleepover dates, in which we would rummage through our mother’s beauty supplies, slather our faces with face masks and put cucumber slices over our eyelids to get rid of puffy eyes. (Really? Did we really need to worry about puffy eyes?) We listened to Seals and Crofts “Summer Breeze,” face masks hardening on our faces like cement. Straight out of a Patty Duke Show.

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Get Clear on the Outcome

This morning I spent an hour on the phone with Verizon Wireless to undo an erroneous charge.

Although this was not how I planned to start my day, it helped me realize something about manifestation. As I dialed Verizon, I asked myself, “What do I want?” Once my intention was clear, I was able to pursue it with determination. Yet, I wasn’t attached to the outcome, which kept me calm and focused. I wanted my account credited, but I knew I’d be okay if it didn’t happen. After talking to four different people, however, I eventually got it.

Whatever your dreams—a refund on your cellular data plan or something much bigger—set your intention, release attachment to the outcome, and feel it with all your might. My mom calls this “acting as if.” Act as if your future is already a reality and believe it or not, once you truly feel your dreams, they do indeed come true.

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Tomato explosion!

Cherry, beefsteak, sungold, green zebra. Who doesn't like a ripe, juicy tomato in the peak of summer? They seem to pop out all at once in our gardens, CSA baskets, and markets, which is why we eagerly wait all summer for them to appear. There are so many varieties to choose from, each with a distinct taste, scent, and texture. Even the health benefits vary from one variety to another: smaller cherry tomatoes contain higher levels of beta-carotene than the larger beefsteak and field tomatoes.

 

Across the board, tomatoes are a nutritional powerhouse. The vitamins, minerals, and carotenoids (a type of phytonutrients) can help protect against cancer, maintain healthy skin, maintain blood pressure, and lower blood glucose in diabetics.  Let's dive in a little deeper about some of the health supportive effects of tomatoes. 

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Simple Mango Gazpacho

I’ve been on a raw food kick lately. I find that it’s what my body craves in the summer heat, and it always helps me feel lighter and more alive if I’m feeling down, dull, or generally far from my higher self :) I’ve been eating a ton of salads, zoodles, juicy melon mono-meals, and pureed soups.


So, gazpacho has been a weekly staple for us. I like to vary the recipe every time I make it so as to not get bored, and also because there are so many possibilities to explore in the gazpacho realm. Check out our Red LentilSpicy StrawberryWatermelon, and Pineapple Cucumber gazpacho recipes.


This mango version is so refreshing with its lovely balance of sweet, savory, and spicy notes. It couldn’t be easier to make, too – just throw everything in the blender, chill, and enjoy.

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Dial up the flavor AND health! Incorporate more fresh herbs & spices

Did you know that fresh herbs and spices don’t JUST 10x flavor (as if that weren’t enough), but that they have magical healing powers, too? Many contain compounds capable of modifying gene expression to potentially keep cancer and other diseases at bay, plus providing immune support, controlling inflammation, and warding off bacteria and viruses—i.e., they have superpowers! So we’re not talking just enhancing taste, but improving wellness and possibly increasing longevity when you reach for that spice jar or throw some chopped herbs in whatever you’ve got cooking.

I’m delighted to share one of my favorite posts from the archives on this topic. If you haven’t seen it before, take a few moments to absorb this truly remarkable knowledge developed over the past decade of nutrition research. Plus get 2 superb recipes, including one of my most popular potato recipes ever. Serious yum!

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Cultivating Your Life

Often the effort we put into something has a direct correlation with our satisfaction. If you are a picky eater or if you have children who won’t touch a vegetable with a ten-foot pole, grow a vegetable garden. It sounds like a crazy idea, but you may discover a latent penchant for kale, tomatoes, or zucchini as a result of the love and time that you put into your little patch of earth. There is power in growing your own food, be it a small pot of mint on your kitchen counter or an acre of vegetables. I’m constantly in awe of nature’s majesty when I see what one tiny seed can become.

What other things in your life might you perceive differently if you spent time tending to them and nurturing them?

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